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VibrantNebula

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  1. @pandorasator9 - They accept standard microUSB. You can charge them via your PC's onboard USB ports or via any other USB power source like a phone charger. The Vive controllers are also MicroUSB - you can use the same cables.
  2. @Survios - Currently we can only accept builds via the developer console. Our content operations teams are currently building out enhanced functionality within the current devconsole submission workflow and we're evaluating how to add additional submission tools in the future. A CLI feature will require some refactors and rebuilds on both our backend as well as the SDK side - it's definitely a target but there's some initial groundwork that needs to occur before we can move towards CLI support. If anybody else is reading this and wants CLI as well - feel free to voice your opinion on this thread for our operations team to see.
  3. @Ahmed Ashour , @henrikvrtraveler is right, this would be a custom project and his response's focus about latency is dead-on, you'd want to solve for it in a way that has the least amount of latency. The only turnkey solution I currently know that can accomplish this is ModalVR. @Cotta @Tony PH Lin
  4. @Eivind - I sent you a PM with an email address you can contact specifically for Vive.com store support
  5. @Jakey - I'd have to ask a manager to see if we have an expected lifespan number. It's a pretty complex device - since there are so many variables I'm sure that any bench and stress testing won't fully be able to account for real-world scenarios fully.
  6. @dipankerJuego - Is your project based in Unity or Unreal Engine?
  7. @John-Inge - The best way to get this repaired is to collect the serial number from the back of the unit, navigate to www.vive.com/support -> contact us (in the navbar) -> contact us. This will link you to a live chat agent specific to your region who can process an RMA repair request for you. While Valve is the sole manufacturer of 2.0 stations - as resellers of the station in the Vive Pro full kit, it is covered under a warranty by Vive and thus we process any repair or swapping of the unit if it fails under warranty.
  8. @KORIF I would recommend untaping the sensors, play until you're able to reproduce the issue, and then going into SteamVR -> Developer -> WebConsole to access the SteamVR logs in-real time. Next, search for the term, "back-facing" - if the filter shows a bunch of output lines that have that term - it means the issue may be an environmental reflection.
  9. @Jakey - It's primarily dependent on region as conditions and the queue line will vary at each authorized service provider. I've just verified with our hardware support team that all centers are operating under normal conditions and that no center has an abnormally long repair queue so the turn around time the agent from your region quotes you should be fairly accurate.
  10. @Zephroth - Again copying from another reply to you in a different thread: While I understand your frustration - you can confuse and frustrate other people when you post incorrect assertions such as those above. There are numerous fail states which can result in power for the laser emission source being cut to prevent bad tracking data from being outputted by the station - failure of that laser source simply isn't very common whereas mechanical deviation can be a more common failure point. The video I linked discusses how the lasers will shut off if the rotor speed falls outside of the timing tolerance - it's presented by Alan Yates who is one of the principal inventors of base-station tracking hence why I cited it in my response - it's a primary resource. While I certainly apologize that a live care agent mis-attributed your specific case to physical damage (which is actually one of the most common reasons for station failure which is likely why the said it) - replying to numerous threads blaming the "diodes" negatively impacts other customers because it's not accurate to the actual functionality of the stations.
  11. @Zephroth Are you referring to the fact that if you look at the station, one or both of the laser sources isn't visible? The stations are able to detect any irregularities in the speed or rotation path of the rotor and if it falls outside of the tolerable range, the power for that laser source is cut to prevent bad tracking data from being emitted from the station. While laser sources can fail, it's relatively rare compared to general mechanical issues such as motor irregularities or separation of the lens from the laser aperture - our repair centers report back numbers on this kind of stuff.
  12. Copying my reply to @Zephroth from another thread. @Adsim93 Base-stations are high precision mechanical devices - they often fail because the unit will have a part fail or the motors will be unable to satisfy the tight timing requirements of SteamVR's tracking system. A 1.0 base-station has two motors, each operating at 3600RPM which equates to ~216,000 revolutions per hour - per motor, all of which needs to happen within very tight timing constraints. As you can imagine, over a year or two these accumulate tens to potentially hundreds of millions of revolutions. Any base-station regardless of who manufacturers it is prone to wear and tear - it's a byproduct of the system being fully dependent on high-speed mechanics. It's why you see it on 1.0 stations manufactured by HTC as well as 2.0 stations manufactured by Valve. Valve has tried to reduce the overall complexity by removing one of the motors in the 2.0 stations but it's still mechanical. Until there are solid state base-stations, this is the trade-off for the increased tracking resolution provided by light-house. I'd recommend watching this presentation by one of the key inventors of base-station tracking to get a feel for how complex the system is and why these failures can occur: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75ZytcYANTA
  13. @Zephroth Base-stations are high precision mechanical devices - they often fail because the unit will either have a part fail or the motors will be unable to satisfy the tight timing requirements of SteamVR's tracking system. A 1.0 base-station has two motors, each operating at 3600RPM which equates to ~216,000 revolutions per hour - per motor, all of which needs to happen within very tight timing constraints. As you can imagine, over a year or two these accumulate tens to hundreds of millions of revolutions. Any base-station regardless of who manufacturers it is prone to wear and tear - it's a byproduct of the system being fully dependent on high-speed mechanics. It's why you see it on 1.0 stations manufactured by HTC as well as 2.0 stations manufactured by Valve. Valve has tried to reduce the overall complexity by removing one of the motors in the 2.0 stations but it's still mechanical. Until there are solid state base-stations, this is the trade-off for the increased tracking resolution provided by light-house. I'd recommend watching this presentation by one of the key inventors of base-station tracking to get a feel for how complex the system is and why these failures can occur: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75ZytcYANTA
  14. @Gary Schilling This is very confusing. Only the It sounds like you're talking about the HMD tether coming unplugged from the headset. For that, you remove the foam facial interface, gently remove the compartment cover by pulling it away from the HMD, and then you can remove and reseat the cable. The cable is oriented so that the circle should be facing upwards:
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